Fighting and Writing By Luise White

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Author :
Publisher : Duke University Press
ISBN 13 : 1478021284
Total Pages : 301 pages
Book Rating : 4.4/5 (21 download)

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Book Synopsis Fighting and Writing by : Luise White

Download or read book Fighting and Writing by Luise White and published by Duke University Press. This book was released on 2021-03-05 with total page 301 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. In Fighting and Writing Luise White brings the force of her historical insight to bear on the many war memoirs published by white soldiers who fought for Rhodesia during the 1964–1979 Zimbabwean liberation struggle. In the memoirs of white soldiers fighting to defend white minority rule in Africa long after other countries were independent, White finds a robust and contentious conversation about race, difference, and the war itself. These are writings by men who were ambivalent conscripts, generally aware of the futility of their fight—not brutal pawns flawlessly executing the orders and parroting the rhetoric of a racist regime. Moreover, most of these men insisted that the most important aspects of fighting a guerrilla war—tracking and hunting, knowledge of the land and of the ways of African society—were learned from Black playmates in idealized rural childhoods. In these memoirs, African guerrillas never lost their association with the wild, even as white soldiers boasted of bringing Africans into the intimate spaces of regiment and regime.

Unpopular Sovereignty By Luise White

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Author :
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
ISBN 13 : 022623522X
Total Pages : 368 pages
Book Rating : 4.2/5 (235 download)

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Book Synopsis Unpopular Sovereignty by : Luise White

Download or read book Unpopular Sovereignty by Luise White and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2015-03-23 with total page 368 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. In 1965 the white minority government of Rhodesia (after 1980 Zimbabwe) issued a unilateral declaration of independence from Britain, rather than negotiate a transition to majority rule. In doing so, Rhodesia became the exception, if not anathema, to the policies and practices of the end of empire. In Unpopular Sovereignty, Luise White shows that the exception that was Rhodesian independence did not, in fact, make the state that different from new nations elsewhere in Africa: indeed, this history of Rhodesian political practices reveals some of the commonalities of mid-twentieth-century thinking about place and race and how much government should link the two. White locates Rhodesia’s independence in the era of decolonization in Africa, a time of great intellectual ferment in ideas about race, citizenship, and freedom. She shows that racists and reactionaries were just as concerned with questions of sovereignty and legitimacy as African nationalists were and took special care to design voter qualifications that could preserve their version of legal statecraft. Examining how the Rhodesian state managed its own governance and electoral politics, she casts an oblique and revealing light by which to rethink the narratives of decolonization.